32 Bit App On 64 Bit Mac

Oct 15, 2019  OverDrive for Mac and OverDrive MP3 audiobooks are not compatible with the newest macOS version, 10.15 (Catalina), because Apple requires all apps in macOS Catalina or newer to be 64-bit. Find 32-Bit Mac Apps. On the desktop, click on the Apple logo ( ) at the upper left of the screen. Click About This Mac. In the window that pops up, click System Report. Oct 25, 2018  Apple pushing 32-bit app warning live for macOS 10.13.4 as. This has led to speculation that the next big update to Mac OS will be 64-bit only. With such heavy-handed hinting, such a conclusion is not unreasonable.

With the arrival of macOS Catalina, Apple's transition towards 64-bit technology is complete. Starting with macOS Catalina, 32-bit apps no work on your computer. With that being said, there are some workarounds to consider if you happen to have older software that's essential for work or play. Think VM!

Do this first

Before doing anything else, you should check with the app developer to see if a 64-bit version of your software title is available. The transition to 64-bit technology was a lengthy one for Apple and the odds are high that your developer did make the switch.

Do you have 32-bit apps installed on your system?

Convert 32 bit app to 64 bit mac

Moving on, you can confirm whether you have 32-bit apps on your Mac by:

  1. Choose the Apple icon on the Mac toolbar.
  2. Click About This Mac.
  3. Select System Report.
  4. Select Legacy Software in the sidebar. All legacy software is 32-bit.

Use virtualization to run your old apps

Here's a look at the best ways to run older software on your Mac.

Running older software

The issue with running old versions of software is that it can eventually 'break' and not function on a future version of the OS you are running it on. You can hope that the vendor of your application will keep on updating the software to run on future OS updates, but what if you have a very specific program that is no longer maintained? Or perhaps you have a software license for your current version of an application but upgrading to a more modern version introduces too great a cost?

Running a virtual machine

One possible solution to the 32-bit application dilemma is to run a version of the latest macOS that fully supports your app in a virtual machine. A virtual machine, or VM, is an emulated computer running on top of your current OS installation as a program. The VM takes resources from your actual computer and uses them to run itself in a contained environment as a separate system altogether. Think of it like the Matrix where the real world is your physical computer and the 'dream' world in the VM.

Benefits of a VM

Since you needn't buy new hardware, you can simply run an instance of the macOS version that will run your application without issue regardless of that app being 32 bit or 64 bit for as long as you keep your VM. If you upgrade the macOS on your physical Mac, the VM version is completely separate from that process so you'll still be able to keep the 'old' macOS on the VM and run the 'new' macOS for all of your other up-to-date programs. You'll be able to have your proverbial cake and eat it too.

Setting up a VM

There are a few options for VM software solutions for you to choose from. You can run Virtualbox, VMware, QEMU, and Parallels. All of the non-open source VM managers have free 'lighter' versions that will serve our purpose but you can get their full fledge versions that provide various features that are beyond the scope of this article.

32 Bit Software On 64

We will be using Parallels Lite that is freely downloadable from the App Store. We chose Parallels Lite due to their ease of setup and ability to function on top of a macOS host passing system information that is needed for the guest macOS to properly install. Note that if one day you'd want to change your Mac's operating system to Windows or Linux then you'd might want to install one of the other mentioned VM managers since those can run on those host OSs albeit with a much more involved setup.

We will also be using macOS High Sierra as the installed OS. You can use these instructions for older versions as well. Credit to Howtogeek.com for the command line bits to make a disk image to install macOS High Sierra from their Virtualbox install instructions on Windows 10.

  1. Download Parallels Lite from the App Store.
  2. Download (but do not install) macOS High Sierra.

  3. We need to create the install image so we need to start Terminal.

  4. In Terminal in your home directory type or copy and paste line by line the following:
    1. hdiutil create -o HighSierra.cdr -size 7316m -layout SPUD -fs HFS+J
    2. hdiutil attach HighSierra.cdr.dmg -noverify -nobrowse -mountpoint /Volumes/install_build
    3. asr restore -source /Applications/Install macOS High Sierra.app/Contents/SharedSupport/BaseSystem.dmg -target /Volumes/install_build -noprompt -noverify -erase
    4. hdiutil detach /Volumes/OS X Base System
    5. hdiutil convert HighSierra.cdr.dmg -format UDTO -o HighSierra.iso
    6. mv HighSierra.iso.cdr HighSierra.iso
  5. Start Parallels Lite.
  6. Select Linux only.
  7. Click Continue.
  8. Select Install Windows or another OS from a DVD or image file.
  9. Click Continue.

  10. Select Image File.
  11. Click Select a file.
  12. Navigate to your home directory and select the HighSierra.iso file we created in terminal.
  13. Click Open.
  14. Click Continue.
  15. Select macOS as the operating system type.
  16. Click OK.

  17. Navigate to the folder to house the VM.
  18. Click Select.
  19. Name your VM and click Create.

  20. You can optionally set up any VM options you desire such as (note that these can be changed later too):
    1. Startup and sharing settings in the Options tab.
    2. Choose CPU, memory and graphic options in the Hardware tab.
    3. Still under the Hardware Tab select the CD/DVD sub-option.
    4. Click the dropdown arrow for Source.
    5. Select Chose an Image File.
    6. Navigate to your home folder and select the HighSierra.iso file we created in terminal.
    7. Select Open.
    8. Select Continue.
  21. You can now Start the VM.
  22. Install macOS like you would normally do on any real system

Once you have a completed install, you'll want to install the Parallels Tools program in your VM macOS. This will allow you to be able to seamlessly use your mouse between your real desktop and your VM desktop as well as resize your VM screen on the fly with proper display attributes.

  1. Click the highlighted yellow exclamation point over your VM window.
  2. Click Continue.
  3. On your VM, double-click the Parallels Tools installer that opens.

  4. Complete the installation and reboot your VM.

Final comments

You now have a full-fledged macOS installation that you can keep for your older 32-bit applications once macOS decides to give them the boot. You'll be able to make snapshots of the VM to have different save states. You'll be able to run all native macOS applications you normally do. The drawback will be the speed of execution and disk speed but if you have a powerful Mac, you may not notice too much of a difference depending on the application. Does this solution work for you? Tell us what you'd rather see happen for 32-bit applications on macOS in the comments!

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Beginning June 1, 2018, all new app updates submitted to the Mac App Store had to support 64-bit. Apple is expected to phase out support for 32-bit apps in macOS 10.15, which will almost certainly be previewed at the 2019 Worldwide Developer Conference in June. (It’ll kick off on Monday, June 3.)

32 bit app on 64 bit mac download

32 Bit App On 64 Bit Mac Download

This means that means some older apps that haven’t been updated in awhile will cease to work. Thankfully, it’s easy to tell if an app is 32-bit or 64-bit.

As developers optimize their apps for 64-bit compatibility, Apple is notifying customers when they’re using an app based on 32-bit technology via a one-time alert that appears when you launch a 32-bit app. In macOS Mojave, this alert appears once every 30 days when launching the app.

To check if an app is 32-bit or 64-bit, from the Apple menu, choose About This Mac, then click the System Report button. From the system report, scroll down to Software in the sidebar, then select Applications. When you select an individual application, you will see a field titled 64-bit (Intel). “Yes” indicates 64-bit; “No” indicates 32-bit. If you’re using macOS Mojave (and you should be), select Legacy Software in the sidebar to see all applications that haven’t been updated to use 64-bit processes.

Alternately, you can use the free 32-bit Check application (https://eclecticlight.co/32-bitcheck-archichect/), which lets you save, print, and filter the list. With it, you can check the folders of your choosing, and can check just apps, or all bundles including plugins and other executable code.

32 Bit Software On 64 Bit Machine

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